Game Lets Players Move NYC Skyline Around

Checkmate, One World Trade.

(Credit: Skyline Chess) 

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In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.”

The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble Lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we shared a flat together and would play chess in the evenings,” their Kickstarter page states. “The idea grew out of a conversation about whether we could replace the classic pieces with our favourite buildings.”

In New York, they chose “a range of buildings from across the city, some of which capture the essence of the early 1900’s construction boom and the growth of skyscraper architecture, through to their more contemporary counterparts, along with some of the city’s most recognisable silhouettes.” The terraced houses that were pawns in the London edition will, of course, be replaced by brownstones.

Planners prepared to throw down funds on skyline chess might also enjoy Cards Against Urbanity or Rise Up: The Game of People and Power. Although, let’s be honest: Nothing can beat the humble lego as both toy and teacher of complex land use concepts.

In the place of kings, queens and bishops, imagine sitting down to chess board dominated by One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building.

A pair of London architects could make that dream (that you know you dream) come true. Skyline Chess, founded by Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, turns iconic buildings into ornate chess pieces. The duo’s first set took on their home city of London, Paste reports, with Canary Wharf as the king and the Shard as the queen. They’re currently raising funds on Kickstarter for a New York edition, and have surpassed their $12,671 goal.

“The concept was first conceived when we sh

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Rachel Dovey is an award-winning freelance writer and former USC Annenberg fellow living at the northern tip of California’s Bay Area. She writes about infrastructure, water and climate change and has been published by Bust, Wired, Paste, SF Weekly, the East Bay Express and the North Bay Bohemian

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Tags: urban designarchitecture

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